GLOBAL SCHOLARS THRIVES IN HUB CITIES LIKE TAIPEI

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AUGUST 23, 2017

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In the 2016-17 school year, students and educators from 26 countries and 47 cities participated in the Global Scholars program; 13 of those cities were in the United States and 34 cities outside the U.S. The number of schools participating within each of those cities varies. As the number of participating schools in a particular city expands to include 3 or more schools, it becomes a “hub” city with a “hub” leader or central contact on the ground serving as a liaison with Global Scholars.

Our current hub cities include Barcelona, Boston, Buenos Aires, Buffalo, Fort Lauderdale, London, Madrid, Miami, Mumbai, New York, Taipei, Tel Aviv and Warsaw. For the 2017-18 school year, we are excited to see existing partner cities significantly expand their number of participating schools. In Taipei, Global Scholars will be expanding from 11 to 19 schools. We expect this expansion to continue; in fact, one Taipei school is also revising their English language curriculum in younger grades specifically to better to prepare students for Global Scholars as they reach middle school. This relationship has also been strengthened by having an educator from Taipei working at Global Cities, Inc. this summer, providing valuable feedback and support to our team and curriculum development.

One of the advantages to hub cities is the enhanced interaction among local teachers through professional development and networking. Cities with expanded participation are also able to host events where students and educators come together for end of year celebrations or large Skype sessions with international cities. We look forward to more cities across the globe expanding their participation with Global Scholars.

 
 
 

Middle School is a Critical Time to Develop Global Competency Skills

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JUNE 29, 2017

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Beginning in 2018, the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test for 15-year-olds, administered by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), will include global competency. Middle school is a critical time for young people to develop skills for living in an inter-connected world and participating in a workforce where they will be communicating with people from around the globe.

Model initiatives to prepare students for an inclusive world are being tested today through international digital exchanges, such as our Global Scholars program. Our worldwide network of 10,500 students age 10-13 provides the opportunity to gain global competency skills, attitudes and behavior, with no fee to schools. Urban school districts are encouraged to apply to the Global Scholars program. Priority is given to school districts that present an effective plan for providing leadership and support on the district level.

Interested district leaders can email globalscholars@globalcities.org to learn more.

 
 

Buffalo Schools Host Global Scholars Culmination Night Featuring Skype Call With Peers in Tokyo

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JUNE 19, 2017

Buffalo Public School students who have participated in the Global Scholars program this year came together on June 8 with educators, parents, and administrators to celebrate and showcase their student work. Speakers at the event included Assistant Superintendent of Buffalo City School District Dr. Fatima Morrell, and Meg Louis, Vice President of Global Cities, Inc., as well as a few Global Scholars who also came up to the podium to present their work to the audience.

The event culminated in a Skype call between Buffalo students and their Global Scholars peers in Tokyo, Japan. The students exchanged questions with each other about their favorite parts of the program, information about their cities and schools, and their favorite sports, music, food, and books. Global Scholars from both sides were excited to find out about several shared interests.

The Global Scholars curriculum ends with students creating a Community Action Project that makes a difference in their school or city. One of the projects displayed at the event featured students who partnered with a felt manufacturing company that was disposing their excess felt in a landfill. The students repurposed the excess felt and designed products such as wallets, bags, and cardholders, which were successfully sold at an art fair. Throughout the year these Buffalo students learned about the links between technology and sustainability, saw an opportunity to develop a project, and were able to address a local issue through investigation and collaboration.


#60Lessons Twitter Chat on June 7

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JUNE 5, 2017

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We are excited to host a Twitter chat on Wednesday, June 7 at 8 p.m. (ET) to discuss global education and Fernando Reimers’s new book, Empowering Students to Improve the World in Sixty Lessons. Using the hashtag #60Lessons, we will bring together educators and supporters of global education to share our interest in global learning and tools and insights for the classroom and beyond.

Here is a preview of the questions we will use to guide our conversation on Wednesday:

1.  What is global citizenship education to you, and why is it important?

2.  What opportunities help students understand the world in which they live, and how they can learn to improve it?

3.  What tools and resources can help schools include global education in their curricula?

4.  What challenges do educators face including global competencies in their lesson plans?

5.  How can we better prepare students to succeed in a diverse and interdependent world?

 

Follow us @globalcitiesorg -- we look forward to chatting with you! 

 

A New Resource for Teaching Students to Understand, Care About and Improve the World

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May 25, 2017

As a member of our Advisory Board, Fernando M. Reimers shares in our mission to create opportunities for students to learn about the world and take action as innovators and thinkers. In his new book, Empowering Students to Improve the World in Sixty Lessons, Professor Reimers has joined with his students at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to provide tools and a curriculum prototype for teachers and school leaders who recognize the importance of including global learning in K-12 education systems.

Professor Reimers defines global citizenship education as: “supporting educators so that schools can enhance human rights, educate about shared global challenges, educate for engaged citizenship, focus on dispositions and values as much as skills, and attend to the conditions that make it possible for schools to be effective in achieving these goals.” With praise from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that is planning to assess global competence in PISA 2018, this book is a welcome resource for educators around the globe who are motivating students to appreciate cultural differences and change the world.


 

Global Cities, Inc. Joins with Out of Eden Learn to Cultivate the Next Generation of Global Citizens

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April 26, 2017

Our Global Scholars program offers educators a constructive approach to counter recent trends of xenophobia and intolerance. Using digital technology, students interact across different cultures, gaining an appreciation for diversity and curiosity about the world at an early age. In this effort, we have found common ground with Out of Eden Learn (OOEL), developed by Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Global Cities, Inc. has committed $250,000 to OOEL’s online learning community that fosters thoughtful cross-cultural inquiry and exchange.

As presenters at our symposium last year on The Future of International Digital Learning, OOEL shares our interest in evaluating student outcomes in digital exchanges. Students who participate in these programs are learning from one another in e-classrooms that are geographically diverse. Global Scholars and Out of Eden Learn provide cross-disciplinary curricula that support broader school-specific goals and motivate students to develop an interest in learning about the world and solving global problems. 

“The world has its dangers, just as your hometown does,” said Paul Salopek, a Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist and National Geographic Fellow, speaking to OOEL students who are following Paul on his Out of Eden Walk around the world. He added: “The world is your home, too. Don’t fear it.” Whether building cultural understanding, sparking a desire to communicate or connecting peers around the world, Out of Eden Learn is helping to cultivate the next generation of global citizens. We are pleased to have them as an ally in the vital field of global education.

 

Announcing "Feeding Our Cities"

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MARCH 14, 2017

We are pleased to announce the all-new Global Scholars curriculum for the next school year, leading students worldwide through the complex systems that grow and distribute food to the world.

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Whether you are new to Global Scholars or a multi-year veteran, please contact us to reserve your school's spot in next year's e-classroom. Limited space is available for public school districts worldwide.


How an International e-Classroom Inspires Tech Learning

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FEBRUARY 14, 2017

Digital skills. Cross-cultural savvy. Today's middle school students need both to become tomorrow's global citizens. Educators using the international digital exchange program Global Scholars—and one inventor—came together in New York City on February 7 to discuss the benefits of connecting 10,500 students ages 10-13 through global e-classrooms.

 

Ayah Bdeir, Founder and CEO of LittleBits, added: “The way we approach it—and I think it’s in line with the Global Scholars program—is, we want to equip students to be problem-solvers, to be critical-thinkers so that they can themselves invent the world they want to live in and be adaptable to whatever comes their way. We can help them become collaborative creators.”

“The most important aspect of Global Scholars—at least the one that I value the most—is motivation,” explained Xavier Cortina, Educator at Institut Vall de Llemena in Girona, Spain. “They are sharing their knowledge with students the same age. They use their knowledge of other subjects in a really practical and meaningful way. The students know that the products that they make will not stay inside the classroom but it will be seen by a lot of people.”


Our e-Classroom is Growing

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JANUARY 17, 2017

Welcoming New Cities: Abu Dhabi, Beijing (pictured), Buffalo, Chengdu, Gothenburg, Houston, Manila, Oakland, Providence, St. Louis, Singapore and Tokyo

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Global Scholars Participants:

More than 10,500 students ages 10-13 in 47 cities, 26 countries, on five continents

Global Scholars is the signature program of Global Cities, Inc., a program of Bloomberg Philanthropies. There are no fees to schools for participation in Global Scholars. Space is available for urban public school districts. Priority is given to districts that enroll multiple schools and provide local leadership. If you are a district leader interested in finding out more, please email globalscholars@globalcities.org.